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Yankiwi

Blind Dogs Abundant in the CD?

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40 minutes ago, Mehe said:

What I cant understand is why one would breed from a greyhound that has gone blind 

I have been told this week that there was a trainer who had done this 

 

Because it only effects them after racing days are over

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Where do you get that from testy

I have seen a whole litter of pups blind 

I have had a dog go blind during its racing career 

 

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I wonder if the composition of the track sand could have something to do with it, it’s not very often then come off the track without sand in their eyes

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1 hour ago, Kiwigreys said:

I wonder if the composition of the track sand could have something to do with it, it’s not very often then come off the track without sand in their eyes

No its effecting dogs younger than trial age

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We have one at home who had trouble getting around corners would run wide. When you look at his eyes the pupil shines green and is always enlarged. The stipes requested he get an eye check and he was taken to a canine eye specialist who said he was ok to race daytime but not night time. It sounded like there is a gene that is sometimes passed down. He seems to be the only one in the litter with the problem. After a few more races it became obvious to us he was a danger to himself on the track and others so we retired him. Shame because he could stay like a boy in a lolly shop. He is now just over 4 years old and his sight seems to have deteriorated and he ocassionally bumps into things. But he still enjoys life and a walk most days. But it is definetly something that requires investigation on whether potential breeding dogs/bitches could be tested for the gene and subsequently rehomed and not bred from. It would be a hell of an expensive exercise to have a whole litter with the problem that is for sure?

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Posted (edited)
40 minutes ago, Ami Levrier said:

We have one at home who had trouble getting around corners would run wide. When you look at his eyes the pupil shines green and is always enlarged. The stipes requested he get an eye check and he was taken to a canine eye specialist who said he was ok to race daytime but not night time. It sounded like there is a gene that is sometimes passed down. He seems to be the only one in the litter with the problem. After a few more races it became obvious to us he was a danger to himself on the track and others so we retired him. Shame because he could stay like a boy in a lolly shop. He is now just over 4 years old and his sight seems to have deteriorated and he ocassionally bumps into things. But he still enjoys life and a walk most days. But it is definetly something that requires investigation on whether potential breeding dogs/bitches could be tested for the gene and subsequently rehomed and not bred from. It would be a hell of an expensive exercise to have a whole litter with the problem that is for sure?

These statistics need to be notified, collated, logged, and studied. Then and only then can lines be accurately identified to eliminate gene disorders and diseases from future breeding. The GRNZ should have begun data collection years ago. Also, rehoming agencies need to be brought into line. Accurate retirement records would identify disease which manifests after retirement from the track. Types of cancer, diabetes, coronary, blindness, etc. Together the data would give an accurate picture of why and how. At present large breeders may be compounding the problem by being allowed multiple litters to the same bitches. If sires are responsible for genetic failures, then those culpable need to be identified and retired.

Edited by Cockyaleg

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43 minutes ago, Cockyaleg said:

These statistics need to be notified, collated, logged, and studied. Then and only then can lines be accurately identified to eliminate gene disorders and diseases from future breeding. The GRNZ should have begun data collection years ago. Also, rehoming agencies need to be brought into line. Accurate retirement records would identify disease which manifests after retirement from the track. Types of cancer, diabetes, coronary, blindness, etc. Together the data would give an accurate picture of why and how. At present large breeders may be compounding the problem by being allowed multiple litters to the same bitches. If sires are responsible for genetic failures, then those culpable need to be identified and retired.

As the owner of two studs and broods, I contacted the vets studying this, as well as the canine geneticists.  Both said it wasnt genetic and even if I ran the tests it wouldn't be an accurate result.  The genetic version is called PRA, progressive retinal atrophy, which many vets are diagnosing this as, as this is common in other breeds.

This greyhound version I believe is called degenerative retinal atrophy, which is very difference and trauma related not genetic 

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1 hour ago, Mischief managed said:

As the owner of two studs and broods, I contacted the vets studying this, as well as the canine geneticists.  Both said it wasnt genetic and even if I ran the tests it wouldn't be an accurate result.  The genetic version is called PRA, progressive retinal atrophy, which many vets are diagnosing this as, as this is common in other breeds.

This greyhound version I believe is called degenerative retinal atrophy, which is very difference and trauma related not genetic 

Thank you, I am well aware of what this study is about. My point and there was one is this: No reliable breeding data has ever been kept by the GRNZ. The anecdotal evidence from retired racer owners shows a marked increase in disease across the board, cancers top the list, pannus also high. If breeding data was taken seriously, patterns would have emerged which should have been investigated much earlier. The information would have pointed to possible causes, ie, genes, nutrition, toxins, etc, then the risk could have been managed, eliminated.

Now in the case of pannus which is thought to be linked to genetics. People will say it's just pannus, it can be easily managed. Not a great selling point when rehoming dogs to the public. You are passing on a life long cost to someone who believed they were adopting a sound dog. Why would you breed dogs with a known risk of contracting the disease? There is a bigger picture here.

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5 hours ago, Mischief managed said:

As the owner of two studs and broods, I contacted the vets studying this, as well as the canine geneticists.  Both said it wasnt genetic and even if I ran the tests it wouldn't be an accurate result. 

As you have declared your involvement with breeding, what hereditary medical data do you possess prior to looking at potential matings? And do you follow up with the dogs you have bred after they have retired? Are you aware of the post-racing medical history of all your dogs?

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I can't quote you sorry.

But I research what I can prior to using a stud dog.

Yes I follow up on as many dogs I have bred post racing over their lives as I can, including medical history, not of all dogs as due to the way gap works we cannot be given the new owners contact but they are given ours.

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